“Common People”, the documentary film screening series initiated by “Kitas Kinas”, continues in Kaunas Artists’ House and is hosting a screening of “Sympathy for the Devil: the Process Church of the Final Judgment” (dir. Neil Edwards, 2015) at 7 pm, 25 September. This time the screen is graced by a documentary on a cult that allegedly inspired some of the most infamous and gruesome events to take place in the US during the 20th century – “The Process Church of the Final Judgment”.

Google “The Process Church of the Final Judgment” and you’ll discover a long list of conspiracy theories – accused of being the inspiration for Charles Manson, influencing the assassination of Bobby Kennedy, and being the root of the infamous Son of Sam serial killings.

The cult formed in 1960s England, many of its members were drawn from wealthy families and aristocracy. Newspapers branded them us ‘The Devil’s Disciples” and “One of the most dangerous Satanic cults in America”. Ever since, members of “The Process” have adopted a secretive stance. Only now, former members reveal the truth, talks about their believes, rituals and secrets with the insights from filmmaker John Waters, musician George Clinton and contraculture icon Genesis Breyer P-Orridge.

Dir. Neil Edwards
Documentary, UK, Canada, USA, 2015, English, 101 mins.

Tickets and discounts: tickets cost 3 EUR (2 EUR concessions – schoolchildren, students, seniors). Tickets can be purchased on the door and at “Tiketa” sales points in person and online.

The „Common People“ screening series aims to discuss not only the content of documentary films, but also the whole notion of documentary cinema. The series adresses questions of ethics, directorial decisions. To film or not to film? When does a director cross the line of closeness with their subject? Should documentary cinema reflect ‘reality’ or the vision of its creator? These questions and others are raised and discussed looking at films who maintain a close look at people telling their own stories: sensitive, creative, eccentric and based somewhere in the margins.