“Common People”, the documentary film screening series initiated by “Kitas Kinas”, continues in Kaunas Artists’ House and is hosting a screening of “The Devil and Daniel Johnston” (dir. Jeff Feuerzeig, 2005) at 7 pm, 16 October. This time the screen is graced by a documentary a story about Daniel Johnston, manic-depressive genius singer/songwriter/artist and his portrait of madness, creativity and love.

Best documentary at Sundace Film Festival 2005 and the best music documentary of the 21st century recently named by IndieWire – “The Devil and Daniel Johnston” is a fascinating film that was well-constructed – using audio tapes, video, interviews and a few scenes of Daniel today.

Born January 22, 1961, the late Daniel Johnston began expressing himself through art as a child while doctors struggled to accurately diagnose his unusual behavior. In addition to drawing prolifically, he began using a boombox record curiously stirring songs to cassette tape in high school. Following his brother to Texas, he eventually landed in Austin, working unskilled jobs while continuing to record and self-distribute music to friends and friendly strangers. It was this distinctive voice that compelled local musicians to share his art beyond Austin’s city limits, culminating in respected indie musicians like Tom Waits, Lana Del Rey, Beck, Beach House, Wilco and many others to either record his songs or reach out to collaborate.

Four years in the making, film honors the complex artistry of Daniel Johnston while exploring how bipolar disorder and schizophrenia distorted his behavior and informed his haunting work.

Dir. Jeff Feuerzeig
Documentary, Biography, Music, USA, 2005, English, 110 min.

Tickets and discounts: tickets cost 3 EUR (2 EUR concessions – schoolchildren, students, seniors). Tickets can be purchased on the door and at “Tiketa” sales points in person and online.

The „Common People“ screening series aims to discuss not only the content of documentary films, but also the whole notion of documentary cinema. The series adresses questions of ethics, directorial decisions. To film or not to film? When does a director cross the line of closeness with their subject? Should documentary cinema reflect ‘reality’ or the vision of its creator? These questions and others are raised and discussed looking at films who maintain a close look at people telling their own stories: sensitive, creative, eccentric and based somewhere in the margins.